Why Himalaya is called biodiversity hotspot?

Eastern Himalayas form a part of the Himalayan global biodiversity hotspot. This region is exceptionally rich in diversity and endemism. It comprises of parts of Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim, Arunanchal Pradesh and extends up to Burma. This region has an estimated 9000 plant species, out of which 3500 are endemic.

Why Himalayan range is rich in biodiversity?

The Himalayan range is a confluence of the Trans-Himalayan zone, Himalayan zone, and Northeast zone, Which are part of the Biodiversity Hotspot as well. These zones have Tropical, Temperate and Tundra type of climate which makes it rich in biodiversity of flora and fauna.

What is Himalaya biodiversity?

The entire region, spread over 3.95 lakh sq. km., is home to 280 species of mammals, 940 species of birds, 316 species of fishes, 200 species of reptiles and 80 species of amphibians. This put together accounts for 27.6% of the total vertebrate diversity of the country.

Why India is called biodiversity hotspot?

Biodiversity hotspots are regions with high species richness and a high degree of endemism. The British biologist Norman Myers coined the term “biodiversity hotspot” in 1988 as a biogeographic region characterized both by exceptional levels of plant endemism and by serious levels of habitat loss.

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Is Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot?

The Western Ghats are one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots with over 5,000 flowering plants, 139 mammals, 508 birds and 179 amphibian species. At least 325 globally threatened species occur here. … At 2695m, Mt Anamudi in Kerala, India is the highest peak in the Western Ghats.

Why is species biodiversity decreasing in the Himalayas?

Habitat Loss

The conversion of forests for agriculture and exploitation for timber, fodder and fuelwood threaten the biodiversity in this region. Charcoal production in low elevation areas and intensive grazing at higher elevations also threatens forests.

Is Himalaya a biodiversity hotspot?

The Eastern Himalaya Biodiversity Hotspot contains exceptional freshwater biodiversity and ecosystems that are of vital importance to local and regional livelihoods, but these are under threat from the developmental and use pressures arising from the 62 million people living in the area.

Why Is Japan a biodiversity hotspot?

The intersection of three tectonic plates generates numerous hot springs and volcanoes creating a basis for unique environments, and therefore propagating unique life. Japan consists of a wide range of ecosystems and biodiversity, resulting in a plethora of rare flora and fauna.

Is Eastern Himalayas biodiversity hotspot?

Eastern Himalayas form a part of the Himalayan global biodiversity hotspot. This region is exceptionally rich in diversity and endemism. It comprises of parts of Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim, Arunanchal Pradesh and extends up to Burma.

What is biodiversity Upsc?

Biodiversity – Species, Genetics & Ecosystem Biodiversity [UPSC Notes] Biodiversity can be defined as a community of all the living organisms on the earth and the diversity among them from all the ecosystems. Biodiversity is thus the variability between the species, within the species, and between the ecosystem.

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Who designates biodiversity hotspots?

The term ‘biodiversity hotspot’ was coined by Norman Myers (1988). He recognized 10 tropical forests as “hotspots” on the basis of extraordinary level of plant endemism and high level of habitat loss, without any quantitative criteria for the designation of “hotspot” status.

Who identifies biodiversity hotspots?

The concept of biodiversity hotspots was developed by the Norman Myers in 1988 when he identified that the tropical forest losing its plants species as well as habitat. IUCN prepares ‘Red Data Book’. There are 34 areas around the world which are qualified as Biodiversity hotspots.

Is Sundarban a biodiversity hotspot?

Sunderbans forests, locally known as Badabon, are one of the richest biodiversity hotspots in India. This UNESCO World Heritage site is known for its mangroves, coastal forests that serve as a biological buffer between the land and sea.

Why is Sri Lanka a biodiversity hotspot?

Sri Lanka is a biodiversity hotspot with an abundance of ecosystems and many endemic species. Its animals and plants are greatly threatened by human activity and the impacts of climate change, putting the world at risk of losing this irreplaceable wealth of wildlife.

Which is the largest biodiversity hotspot in India?

The Indo-Burma region, one of the largest hotspots, covers Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos PDR and also includes the Gangetic plains, areas around the Brahmaputra river and parts of Andaman and Nicobar Islands.