Why does carbon need to cycle through an ecosystem?

The carbon returns to the atmosphere when the plants decay, are eaten and digested by animals, or burn in fires. Because plants and animals are an integral part of the carbon cycle, the carbon cycle is closely connected to ecosystems. As ecosystems change under a changing climate, the carbon cycle will also change.

Why is it necessary for carbon to cycle through ecosystems?

The carbon cycle is important in ecosystems because it moves carbon, a life-sustaining element, from the atmosphere and oceans into organisms and back again to the atmosphere and oceans.

Why are cycles important to an ecosystem?

Why Biogeochemical Cycles Are Important

The cycles move elements through ecosystems, so the transformation of things can happen. They are also important because they store elements and recycle them. Moreover, biogeochemical cycles can show you the connection among all living and nonliving things on Earth.

How does carbon dioxide cycle through an ecosystem?

Carbon dioxide is absorbed by producers to make glucose in photosynthesis. Animals feed on the plant passing the carbon compounds along the food chain. … Decomposers break down the dead organisms and return the carbon in their bodies to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide by respiration.

Why is carbon so important?

Carbon is the most important element to living things because it can form many different kinds of bonds and form essential compounds.

IMPORTANT:  How do ecologists classify ecosystems?

What would happen without the carbon cycle?

The Short Answer:

Carbon is in carbon dioxide, which is a greenhouse gas that works to trap heat close to Earth. … If it weren’t for carbon dioxide, Earth’s ocean would be frozen solid.

Why are plants important to the carbon nitrogen and water cycles?

The first is through photosynthesis, where plants take in CO2, water and sunlight to create sugars for energy, and oxygen gas emerges as a by-product. Once inside plants, carbon moves through food chains, where organisms become nutrients including herbivores, carnivores and ultimately, decomposers.